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October 9, 2014

Prof. Ron Allen in China

by Dan Rodriguez
Ma Kai, Vice Premier of China, presents the 2014 China Friendship Award to Professor Ronald J. Allen

Ma Kai, Vice Premier of China, presents the 2014 China Friendship Award to Professor Ronald J. Allen

Earlier this month, Professor Ronald Allen was awarded the 2014 China Friendship Award. Ron recently returned from the award ceremony in Beijing, where he and his fellow award recipients were well and justly celebrated—they met with the Prime Minister and Vice-Prime Minister, and they were invited by the President to attend a state dinner celebrating the 65th Anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic of China. Ron was also the guest of honor at a publication party for his book, Professor Allen on Evidence.

While he was in Beijing he also met with members of the Supreme People’s Court to discuss the ongoing efforts to develop a modern universal evidence code for the People’s Republic of China.

 

Professor Ronald J. Allen and Shen Deyong, Vice-President of the Supreme People’s Court

Professor Ronald J. Allen and Shen Deyong, Vice-President of the Supreme People’s Court

Ron is the Chair of the Foreign Board of Advisors of the Evidence Law and Forensic Sciences Institute at China University of Political Science and Law in Beijing. He is also the sole non-Chinese advisor to the National Research Project on the Law of Evidence, an initiative conducted at the behest of the Supreme People’s Court as part of the effort to reform that country’s evidentiary rules. Ron has been working with the Chinese on this for nearly fifteen years. In January, he will return to China for a working session with the committee—on which, interestingly, a number of Ron’s former students also serve—to comment on the current draft of the reform document.

 

Professor Ronald J. Allen at the Supreme People’s Court, Beijing, China

Professor Ronald J. Allen at the Supreme People’s Court, Beijing, China

In November, Ron will host an important conference here at Northwestern Law, “The Foundations of the Law of Evidence and their Implications for Developing Countries,” at which legal scholars and prominent law reformers from around the world—notably from China and Tanzania—will discuss the process by which developing countries adapt, adopt, and evolve their legal systems. Based solely on the list of participating scholars, I am confident that the discussions will have real and meaningful effects worldwide.

Thanks to Ron for his many contributions to Northwestern Law, and to the larger world.

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