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Archive for November 2013

27
Nov

Legal service providers come to law school

Interesting description by Bill Henderson (Indiana-B) on course on disruption and LPOs.

Two cheers from me for this.

Yes, law students would benefit of having some exposure to the trends in legal outsourcing and efficiency-enhancing companies and products.  And I like the strategy of having students do research and make presentations (by contrast to, say, having a dog-and-pony show of the companies presenting).

However, in the law school setting, given precious time we have to provide education about law and legal skills, focusing on businesses that disrupt traditional modalities of legal services seems something to come later, not during, legal education.  Don’t get me wrong; educating our students about law and the legal profession requires attention to how law and the profession is changing.  But this is best grounded, to me, in what skills our new lawyers can be and ought to be expected to provide.  Perhaps let them imagine what the LPO market looks like from a deep immersion in “what lawyers need and ought to do” rather than focus explicitly on the companies and their service models.

Still and all, two cheers are warranted.  These efforts help students better understand how our professional world is changing rapidly and, too, how business savvy folks are capitalizing on (and profiting from) these changes.

27
Nov

Interview on “reinventing law”

with Prof. Dan Katz of Michigan State U.’s law school.  Interesting stuff.

25
Nov

Kudos to Prof. Marty Redish

#17 all-time cited legal academic!

25
Nov

Who is applying to law school?

Some interesting data on LSAT breakdowns.  Counters the narrative that high-credentialed students are fleeing law school in especially high numbers.

That said, these data does not refute the brute fact that applicant decline is not located principally in the low-band LSATs.  Law schools across the board are feeling the pinch (albeit to a greater or lesser degree).

25
Nov

“Innovation Economics” project at Searle looks at how technology standards promote innovation

Earlier this year the Searle Center on Law, Regulation, and Economic Growth received a large grant from Qualcomm Incorporated to support a major new research initiative. “Innovation Economics” is an interdisciplinary undertaking that will study patents, technology standards, and standard setting organizations with an eye toward developing a better understanding of how inventive activity occurs, how it is commercialized, and what might be done to facilitate future innovation.

The project, directed by Daniel F. Spulber of the Kellogg School of Management and Searle’s Research Director, will create a set of databases that focus on standards development organizations, standards setting organizations, technology standards, and standard-essential patents; patent licensing, assignment, and litigation; complementary inventions and so-called “patent thickets”; “royalty stacking” and “hold-up”; and markets for patents and the valuation of patents. These databases are being made available to researchers on the Searle Center website.

As part of this initiative, the Searle Center will also host the United States Patent and Trademark Office’s (USPTO) Trademark Case Files Dataset. This dataset contains information about approximately 6.7 million filed trademark applications and registrations issued between January 1870 and January 2012. The information in this dataset includes: data on mark characteristics, prosecution events, ownership classification, third-party oppositions, and renewal history. It, too, is available on the Searle Center website.

Taken together, the constituent elements of the project on Innovation Economics should generate new insights and pave the way for an understanding of the important roles that patents and other types of intellectual property play in innovation.

Congratulations to my colleagues at the Searle Center. I look forward to watching this project develop.

25
Nov

Why law school?

Smart op-ed by Dean Paul at Northeastern Law School in Boston.

18
Nov

Demand for legal services

Data indicating a 5% decline.

Interesting note that the second grouping of AmLaw firms — that is, those between 101 and 200 — showed an increase.

18
Nov

What is law school for?

Provocative answer from Michigan law professor.

15
Nov

Inspirations from Center on Wrongful Convictions annual benefit

Last night at Salvage One in downtown Chicago, the CWC hosted its second annual benefit and awards ceremony.  They honored the filmmakers of the Central Park Five and West Memphis documentaries and Rep. Scott Drury ’97 whose legislative work on behalf of justice reform has assisted greatly the innocence movement in Illinois.

The highlights of the evening were the remarkable comments by four recent exonerees.  Collectively, they spent over sixty years in prison for crimes they did not commit.  To an attentive crowd of 200+, they briefly told their stories and expressed their heartfelt gratitude to all the folks who helped their causes.

God bless each of these brave individuals.  And, again, kudos to the remarkable work of this remarkable organization.  I am very proud that it is a cornerstone of our Bluhm Legal Clinic at Northwestern Law School.

13
Nov

Searle conference on federalism and energy

this Thursday and Friday at Northwestern Law.